By

Vlad Blits
Many people who live in high-crime areas or who commute through them daily are owners of guns. Some types of guns are regulated by the National Firearms Act, which mandates the registration of certain types of guns like automatic weapons and short-barreled rifles. Because of these regulations, NFA guns cannot just be passed along to...
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If you’re thinking about doing estate planning, you might have one question taking shape in your mind: What’s the difference between a will and a trust, and which one is right for me? Estate planning laws in Texas aren’t incomprehensible, but the language and details used can make it appear to be daunting. Explanations about...
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Whether it’s starting a business, starting a marriage, becoming a parent, or losing a parent, significant life changes can have a substantial impact on your perspective for the future. The necessity to figure out how to best protect your children, your spouse, your finances, and your legacy is obvious; however, constructing an estate plan for...
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Most elder law attorneys handle a wide variety of legal matters that concern an older or disabled individual, including issues pertaining to health care, guardianship, retirement, long-term care planning, VA pension, social security, Medicare or Medicaid, and other essential matters. Elder law is a legal term which describes the area of legal practice that places...
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If you want to own guns in Texas and are interested in purchasing Title II firearms restricted by the National Firearms Act (NFA), then you might want to consult a Texas gun trust attorney about a gun trust. A gun trust authorizes you to protect your guns both during and after your lifetime without the...
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The state of Texas recognizes three types of wills as valid if they all possess two mutual requirements: The testator must be considered to be of sound mind and must be at least 18-years-old. Under these conditions, one would assume that a valid will is based on the wishes of a party who is functioning...
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Guardianship basics Age, disease, or accident may deprive a person of the capability to care for one’s personal or financial needs. Texas law suggests a method through which a guardian can handle that individual’s affairs under the oversight of the court. Filing for guardianship is a legal action of last resort when other attempts, such...
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Texas state probate law requires that all estate assets are gathered and that all the decedent’s remaining debts get settled out of those assets. Only after all liabilities have been resolved can the estate’s assets be allocated to the beneficiaries as outlined in the will or, if there is no will, according to Texas intestate...
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The probate process begins with a knowledgeable attorney, skilled at balancing all the moving components of probate: beneficiaries, executors, estate administrators, and wills. There are many aspects to having a will probated, and it is likely not something you want to endure alone. Getting a Will Probated in Texas In the time following the passing...
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When a Medicaid candidate has an overabundance of assets, the Medicaid Asset Protection Trusts (MAPT) can be an invaluable plan of action to satisfy Medicaid’s asset restriction. This sort of trust allows an individual who would have otherwise been disqualified for Medicaid to become eligible again and be provided with the care they need in...
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